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Inside the New York Times

DVD - 2011 | Widescreen edition
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Gain unprecedented access to the New York Times newsroom and the inner workings of the Media Desk. With the Internet surpassing print as the main news source and newspapers all over the country going bankrupt, see the media industry transform at its time of greatest turmoil. Writers like Brian Stelter, Tim Arango, and the salty but brilliant David Carr track print journalism's metamorphosis even as their own paper struggles to stay vital and solvent.
Publisher: [United States] : Magnolia Home Entertainment, c2011
Edition: Widescreen edition
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (91 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in

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StarGladiator
Dec 05, 2018

Who really ever learns anything from a US newspaper anyway? I gave up, finally, on all US newspapers back around 1999 - - when I would read only the Sunday edition of the NY Times' financial/business section, but that became to fictional and silly to bother with [the final article I found repulsive was on tech executives being extolled about the ability to download future programs from the Web, never having to bother to test them on their systems' hardware - - total bunkem!].
Everything I've learned comes from online comments or researching online, but the comments are getting fewer and fewer since all sites today [Exception: zerohedge.com] censor heavily, so one finds almost nothing of informational value as one once did.
So for a short time in modern history, there was a Real News flow in America - - when warrantless wiretapping was on the front page news several times, but then knocked off both times by the two national immigration marches organized by Spanish-language radio stations, one could go online to research into the ownership of those active radio stations [at the time, they were owned by the Blackstone Group, chaired by Rockefeller protege, Peter G. Peterson and it was Sen. Jay Rockefeller who championed the telecoms and warrantless wiretapping back then].
When the markets smelled really foul back in 2005 to 2007, leading up to the global economic meltdown of 2007 to 2009, one could find that the InterContinental Exchange [ICE] was originally financed by Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, BP, Total and Deutsche Bank, then look up the major shareholders in GS and Morgan Stanley [the Big Four: BlackRock, Vanguard, State Street and Fidelity], then look up the major shareholders of ICE: BlackRock, Vanguard, State Street and Fidelity, and not be surprised to learn today that ICE also is the major shareholder in the NYSE and MERSCorp and provides the venue for the LIBOR rate settings or ICE LIBOR - - funny how everything appears to be financially interlocked?
Now look at the ownership [major shareholders] in all the major US media . . .

k
kpelish
Dec 04, 2018

Made in 2010 as social media and independent online publications really started biting into print newspapers' profits and readership. This mini-documentary covers The New York Times—America's most influential paper—reaction and strategy to the digital age as sister newspapers failed or retrenched drastically. Adding an extra star because it champions freedom of press and the crucial need to unyieldingly financially back the hard work of well-written, substantive, fact-checked news (and this was before deliberate fake news/online disinformation campaigns).

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Bookafterbook
Dec 30, 2013

Love the New York Times and can't imagine print media without it. Interesting to see how it has had to reinvent itself. Really interesting doc especially for those who think twitter and facebook are the best...only...alternatives.

o
ottawabooknerd
Nov 27, 2012

This documentary looks at the demise of print newspaper (I still remember buying the NY Times on Sundays for 8$ from Mags and Fags on Elgin street!!) Was interesting to discover some of the journalists such as David Carr and Brian Stelter. Did not like Sam Zell at all, he seems like an arrogant douche.

alexislevesque Sep 21, 2012

I agree with the criticisms expressed, even though the doc introduces us to fascinating characters (David carr especially) I was disappointed overall. I thought we would be exposed to how decisions are made about photographs and headlines that make page one. For a movie that I would think would have access to some of the best photojournalism , the cinematogaphy is limited to conferences, offices - mundane environments and there is very little sense of the urgency that a daily paper is working under. Strictly for newshounds.

b
Bob
May 31, 2012

I really wanted to like this film as I do care very much about the state of media and information delivery. But I just didn't get very much insight here. I learned that the NY Times office functions pretty much like my own - we are privy to mundane footage of staff meetings, cubicle conversations, cross team collaboration, messy workspaces, goodbye parties and so on. And yet through it all I am expected to buy into the idea that all of this is so very worthy and special.

k
kaymul
Dec 28, 2011

I enjoyed this very much. It's worth a watch by anyone who appreciates serious journalism's role in informing those of us who want more than television news to make sense of the world. May the Times and other newspapers live on to do that.

Glencoe_Mike Dec 06, 2011

Interesting look at the state of newspapers in the internet age. Not just about the New York Times but about the role of newspapers as well.

c
CalicoJack
Dec 05, 2011

Staffers of "The New York Times" try repeatedly and without justification to bolster their publication's self-importance in this poorly organized, not very insightful documentary, ostensibly about the transitions modern newspapers are facing.

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